A sample text widget

Etiam pulvinar consectetur dolor sed malesuada. Ut convallis euismod dolor nec pretium. Nunc ut tristique massa.

Nam sodales mi vitae dolor ullamcorper et vulputate enim accumsan. Morbi orci magna, tincidunt vitae molestie nec, molestie at mi. Nulla nulla lorem, suscipit in posuere in, interdum non magna.

Why children do not perform well?

When children do not get good grades in any subject or are not able to perform up to our expectation, we often chide and goad them to work harder in the subject. Is it the right way to assess and motivate the child?

Experiences at School of Creative Learning have shown that the issue of failure in the examination may be a product of various factors like physical ailment, emotional distraction or disturbance, lack of proper motivation, etc. However, even if there is no such problem a child may not do well in the examination due to different learning style or lack of proper mental competencies. For example, if the child is not doing well in mathematical competencies, one must also look whether the child is of different learning style than logical and/or is deficient in

  • Concentration
  • Memory(logical)
  • Rational thinking

If the child is really deficient in these competencies, the child should be asked to perform exercises to develop those competencies. For example, if the learner’s learning style is different, the teaching learning strategy has to be different. See A short note on Multiple intelligence and How to identify the Learning Style of Your Child for details. Further, if the child does not have good concentration, he should do exercises to develop it. Once concentration is developed, a bit of hard work may do wonders. Following chart may help in diagnosing the basic problems in a child. For appropriate solution consult Creative Learning Volunteers or write to us. The table here shows the reasons for poor performance in the following categories (You can click on them to take you to related matter directly):

Continue reading Why children do not perform well?

More Comments on Rat Farming

Rats–coming to your grocers soon!  by John Wood Sr

OpEd News

I personally think Mr Prakash has a noble idea–another good source of cheap protein is invaluable, especially considering how many of the worlds millions live on the edge of starvation. I truly hope that his endeavors are successful, and that his visionary idea spreads across the globe.Which brings us to the United States.

Continue reading More Comments on Rat Farming

Coverage on Rat Farming

BBC News

Read BBC on Rat Farming: August 13, 2008 by Amarnath Tewary

Mr Prakash says his proposals to popularise rat meat eating are intended to uplift their social-economic condition.

“There are twin advantages of this proposal. First, we can save about half of our food grain stocks by catching and eating rats and secondly we can improve the economic condition of the Musahar community,” he told the BBC.

According to Mr Prakash, about 50% of total food grain stocks in the country are eaten away by rodents.

He argues that by promoting rat eating more grain will be preserved while hunger among the Musahar community will be reduced. He said that rat meat is not only a delicacy but a protein-enriched food, widely popular in Thailand and France.

Wall Street Journal

Read Old India rejuvenates as IT rivers of gold dry up: April 10, 2009 in Wall Street Journal by Peter Wonacott

In the village of Deve Kuli, in Bihar, India’s poorest and least literate major state, the Mushahar are the poorest and least literate. Most are farm labourers. About one in 10 can read. So impoverished is this group that they hunt field rats to supplement a deprived diet. Mushahar is Hindi for “rat eater”.

But the outlook for the state’s 2 million Mushahar has brightened in the past year.

Thanks to government aid programs, more Mushahar children are attending school. Increased state investment in roads and local factories has put their parents to work. Demand for labourers has pushed up wages for field work.

In a sign of the times, a government proposal to promote rat farming was ridiculed by the Mushahar, the very group of untouchables, or Dalits, it was supposed to benefit. They worried it would pull their children out of school and extend a social stigma to the next generation. Some protested on the streets of Bihar’s capital, Patna, shouting: “We want to learn to use a computer mouse, not catch mice.”

Growth has slowed in the new India of technology outsourcing, property development and securities trade. But old India – the rural sector that is home to 700 million of the country’s billion-plus people – shows signs it can pick up the slack. The rural awakening helps explain why India continues to grow even as the US recession drags on the world economy.

The change is largely political. In years past, many state leaders rode to power with vows to give voice to lower-caste voters. But after failing for the most part to lift living standards, these officials have been replaced in many cases by leaders who have. In poor and largely rural states from Orissa in the east to Rajasthan in the west, many new leaders have invested in health, education and infrastructure. That has set the stage for the creation of industry and consumer markets and enabled upward mobility.

 

Continue reading Coverage on Rat Farming

Rat Farming in Food & Wine Magazine

The issue of rat eating is discussed in this article The Ubiquitous Rat by Pam Brunning in the Food & Wine Magazine of International Wine and Food Society (IW & FS).

“Rat meat is a healthy alternative to rice and grains,” Vijay Prakash of the Bihar state welfare department told a press conference in Patna , “and should be eaten by one and all. Rat and chicken have equal food values, not only in protein but throughout the entire spectrum of nutrition. I haven’t tried it myself, but my mother has and she finds it delicious. In fact, whoever has eaten rat says it is more spongy and better than even
chicken meat.”

The welfare secretary’s words were greeted with dismay by listeners. “Indian culture is based on vegetarianism,” said chef P. Soundararajan of the Mahindra resort chain. “Our culture and customs are based on not harming any living beings. And besides rats are dirty creatures that only the very poor would eat.”

But Prakash was unrepentant about his government campaign. “ Almost 50% of India’s grain stocks are eaten away by rodents in fields or warehouses. Increased human consumption of rodents will ease soaring food prices and provide increased employment for rat catchers. Rat has almost no bones but many people do not know this simple cuisine fact. We will have a massive media campaign to persuade people to try it. Some of the hotels here in Bihar have started selling rat meat, as a starter. If you order patal-bageri at one of our roadside hotels, that’s what you’ll get. Roasted Rat.”

Some interesting facts from the article:

  • In Aizawl, one of the 11 districts of Mizoram State in India, smoked rat is a highly prized delicacy. The rodent is much in demand in kitchens in this northeastern state. Hundreds of smoked rats come in to the city from nearby villages every morning. Rats caught by traps in paddy fields sell like the proverbial hot cakes. “I don’t keep records of my sales, but Inormally sell about 200 smoked rats daily,” Lalvenpuii, a New Market shopkeeper, told the Indo-Asian NewsService. “They don’t come cheap either, with one smoked rat costing anywhere between Rs.15-20.” (rupees)
  • When food is scarce rats are often a morereadily available source of protein than other fauna. African slaves in the American South hunted wood rats to supplement their food rations. The Aborigines along the coast in Southern Queensland, Australia regularly included rats in their diet. In the Mishmi culture of India, rats are essential to the traditional diet, as the women may eat no meat except fish, pork, wild birds and rats. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that rat meat makes up half the locally produced meat consumed in Ghana, where cane rats are farmed and hunted for their meat.
  • In the 1980’s the University of Reading ran a summer school for Rat Catchers. Students from around the globe spent twelve weeks learning the basics of rodent control in the class room and visiting farms around the district baiting, catching and trapping the rodents. They then returned home to pass on their skills to the locals. Today their talents for catching them live are in much demand.
  • With the credit crunch biting harder people are considering trying alternative forms of protein. Observer columnists Caroline Davies wrote last year, “It’s low in fat, low in food miles and completely free range.” “In fact, some claim that it is about as ethical a dish as it is
    possible to serve on a dinner plate.” No, this time she was not talking of rats but Sciurus carolinensis – the grey squirrel, often known in the country as ‘tree rats’.
  • Butcher David Simpson in Cornwall, whose game counter began selling ‘tree rats’ last year, is struggling to keep up with demand, “We put it on the shelf and it sells.”

Continue reading Rat Farming in Food & Wine Magazine

Gamma-Rays from rotating black holes

Abstract

The gamma-ray luminosity due to the decay of pions produced during spherical accretion onto rotating black holes has been calculated. The model consists of a Kerr black hole of arbitrary angular momentum surrounded by interstellar gas consisting of completely ionized hydrogen atoms. There is an 80% increase in flux as we go from Schwarzschild to the extreme Kerr case.

Paper published in The Astrophysical Journal, 280:848-852, 1984 May 15
Continue reading Gamma-Rays from rotating black holes

Right to Education for underprivileged


Project Background and Description
In 2004-06, APCL had run a project with CEF on ‘Education for Democracy’. In this project, it was found that there was a need to orient learning systems to take care of the socio-cultural context of the underprivileged. For this purpose, it would be better to have laboratories in different subjects, where we can supplement the care and concerns of the underprivileged. In the project teaching learning materials and books were developed for setting up Social Science Laboratories in schools in the class VI to IX. A book was also developed for creating awareness of interactive laws. In order to enhance the self-esteem of underprivileged section three pictorial story books on Shabari was developed. The materials have been used for setting up Social science labs in different schools of Patna, Samastipur and Darbhanga districts.  The pictorial book-sets on Shabari are being used widely for motivational purposes in Mahila Samakhya programme and also by Dalit communities and Non-Governmental Organizations in their motivational programmes for dalits in general and Musahars in particular. It also transpired during the project that we need special targeted materials to meet the special needs of the local underprivileged communities so that their self-esteem may be enhanced which is a pre requisite for any quality learning programme.

In the year 2007, APCL conducted a programme on “Broad streaming of underprivileged education in Jamsaut Panchayat”. The project tried to identify the special learning needs including content and transaction methodology of the underprivileged sections of society and worked on underprivileged children mainly belonging to Musahar community to formulate proper strategy for ensuring right to education in respect of underprivileged community.ChildrenPataniaUnderprivileged Children at Patania

A survey of underprivileged children showed that the children of underprivileged children did not get proper environment at home conducive to motivate them to go for learning. So we have to work at both school and community level. Creative Learning Centres were established and run in the hamlets of underprivileged sections to complement and supplement the learning at school. This has proved very successful for first generation learners and other vulnerable groups. Workshops of stakeholders, VEC members and Panchayat workers were also conducted. Wall writing related to new interactive pictures and social issues related to mathematics, language, social studies were done on the walls of schools. The pictures were so designed that they enhance the self esteem of underprivileged section of society.

Continue reading Right to Education for underprivileged

Achhe ko achha kahein

For viewing a PDF, please visit Achhe ko Achha kahein 

Achhe ko Achha kahein

Achhe ko Achha kahein

Project Pehachan cited

Project Pehachan (Identity) for Rehabilitation of Beggars was cited by N. Sreenivasan in his paper “Money doesn’t begets money”.

Abstract of the Paper

Poverty and Begging are two major social problems. Middle income group businessmen too fail to earn and becomes poor over a period of 5 or 10 years. Mere Money with the Government of Central Bank doesn’t beget money to the poor and to the Beggars. Millennium Development Goals and Agenda 21 achieveements are in the mid way and the deadline is the year 2015. Though the percentage of Poverty in India is gradually decreasing, the Poor and the Beggars still remain in all States due to gaps in policies and implementations. There are two types of Beggars. Both the uneducated poor and the beggars are aware of different types of Money. The lower denominations of coins were withdrawn. Labour are aware of decreasing power of their earned wages and some are prepared for ‘food, accommodation’ and other alternative payments. Some State Governments have undertaken ‘Rehabilitation of Beggars’. ADB Strategies for Poverty Reduction and rehabilitation of Beggars were mentioned Concepts of Sustainability and research findings are modified as a proposed Strategy. To conclude effective implementation of these strategies, beget money to both beggars and to the poor.

For Full Paper go to “Money doesn’t begets money”.

N. Sreenivasan is Director, Global Economists & Management Scientists
Continue reading Project Pehachan cited

Abhivanchiton ka shikshadhikar: Educational Rights for Underprivileged

Abhivanchiton ka Shikshadhikar : Education for Underprivileged

Abhivanchiton ka Shikshadhikar : Educational Rights for Underprivileged

 

The book Abhivanchiton ka Shikshadhikar – Education for Underprivileged, authored by Vijoy Prakash and Prof Shailendra Kr Shrivastava has been published by Rajkamal  Publication, New Delhi.
 
About the book
Modern education system serves the needs of upper and upper middle class only. Confined to their own world realities Lower middle and middle class children don’t get anything get anything except imitating others. We have tried to take education to underprivileged and marginalised, but we are yet to assess the real impact of this education system on them. This book tries to develop parameters of assessment of nature, quality and quantity of education to different communities. At the same time it provides the assessment of education in different communities based on the detailed census of one Panchayat.
 
Based on the action research the book also suggests a practical model for making positive intervention empowering underprivileged to take better advantage of the education system.It also underscores that underprivileged children are as much valuable capital as are children from well off families. What is needed is an honest and  sincere effort to bring them into mainstream. For this purpose the book also suggets modalities for broadsteaming of education for mainstreming of children.

Address on the occasion of the Book Release Function

With HE Governor of Bihar

With HE Governor of Bihar Raghunandan Lal Bhatia

At Raj Bhawan Patna

At Raj Bhawan Patna

Address of Sri Vijoy Prakash on the occasion of the Book Release Function of the book EDUCATION FOR DEMOCRACY

His Excellency the Governor of Bihar Sri Raghunadan Lal Bhatia  and dear friends,

I express my deep gratitude to His Excellency for having spared his valuable time to release our book Education for Democracy. This book was born out of the desire to see a democratic society based on the principles enshrined in the preamble of the Constitution of India. Sir, in last sixty years the shoots of democratic governance has spread and matured in our country but we wanted to see how much deeper has  the roots of democracy  gone  into the soil. We understand that development of democratic values in citizens is the primary condition for the success of democracy in a country. As children are our future citizens, in 2004 we tried to study the orientation of democratic values in 1366 school going children in the age group of 11-18 years in the district of Patna and Samastipur.The result is with you in the form of the book Education For Democracy. Continue reading Address on the occasion of the Book Release Function